Fattening Frogs For Snakes. By John Sinclair v. 1.0

By Steven James Pratt.


(The Poet - John Sinclair.)


"he tells us about Johnson's apprenticeship and that original meeting of musician and devil at those famous crossroads, or when he introduces the story of Slim by connecting the gospel of "This Train" with Little Walter's "My Babe" and winds his way back to Slim's namesake, the Sunnyland Train, concluding, "He traveled fast and could be dangerous." Sinclair even has a charming, scholarly way of crediting his sources, name-checking writers like Robert Palmer and Pete Welding as he goes. -- Jon Garelick. http://www.bostonphoenix.com/boston/music/otr/documents/02458016.htm



Fleastyle feedback:

Here are tales of heroic men
Fighting with music, with a GUITAR
With a harmonica, a tin-can, a bottle
A coke bottle top. Life and Death. Story.
Fighting the snake charm of materialism
The greed machines and pure'

Satanical shitstem.
Industrial-Agricultural-media monster. Ugh.

Here are tales, localized and time-binded in story.
By our beat poet, guest, scholar in residence, in Europe.
Hear to speak right knowledge, and bard on.
Plucking head and heart strings, PING. Another book saved!
Tales for humans to resonate with
Time-space binded Poems, for the general heart mind.
Including history. And all humanity under its light.
A history of history within history
In some sense , retold tales of legend upon legend.
The tale of Fattening Frogs for Snakes;
Singing matter, fucking matter, shouting matter
Dancing matter. Smoking Matter.
Fly feedback....on Poetic historicism,
Music criticism and the post modern
condition of Dr. John Sinclair.




"Fattening Frogs for Snakes," yeh, that's what Americans do, except the ones that really is snakes. That is the United SNAKES ain't it? So from jump, John know, what the definition of hope to die (say when) American is. And he rejects it like the music do. The music reject it because American is a definition of what ain't got no use for the blues or for those who make the blues.--Amiri Baraka, Foreword to Fattening Frogs for Snakes by John Sinclair.